Broadband speed is a crucial enabler of IP traffic. Broadband-speed improvements result in increased consumption and use of high-bandwidth content and applications. The global average broadband speed continues to grow and will double from 2017 to 2022, from 39.0 Mbps to 75.4 Mbps. Table 4 shows the projected broadband speeds from 2017 to 2022. Several factors influence the fixed broadband-speed forecast, including the deployment and adoption of Fiber-to-the-home (FTTH), high-speed DSL, and cable broadband adoption, as well as overall broadband penetration. Among the countries covered by this study, Japan, South Korea, and Sweden lead within the Cisco VNI countries in terms of broadband speed largely because of their wide deployment of FTTH.
A few countries also have users that currently experience greater than 125 Mbps, paving the path for the future demands of video. Video continues to be of enormous demand in today’s home, but there will be significant bandwidth demands with the video application requirements of the future, even beyond the forecast period of 2022. In Figure 19, a scenario with video applications of the future is explored; today’s bandwidth needs are a sliver of the future needs.

Although the number of connections is growing 2.4-fold, global M2M IP traffic will grow more than sevenfold over this same period, from 3.7 EB per month in 2017 (3 percent of global IP traffic) to more than 25 EB by 2022 (6 percent of global IP traffic; refer to Figure 12). The amount of traffic is growing faster than the number of connections because of the increase of deployment of video applications on M2M connections and the increased use of applications, such as telemedicine and smart car navigation systems, which require greater bandwidth and lower latency.
If you already have a website or blog, look for vendors that offer related but noncompeting products and see if they have an affiliate program. Stick to familiar products and brands—they're easier to sell. For promotion, place simple text or graphics-based ads in appropriate places on your site; you can review or recommend products or create a dedicated sales page or website to promote a particular product.
Cost per click was more common in the early days of affiliate marketing but has diminished in use over time due to click fraud issues very similar to the click fraud issues modern search engines are facing today. Contextual advertising programs are not considered in the statistic pertaining to the diminished use of cost per click, as it is uncertain if contextual advertising can be considered affiliate marketing.
This estimate is based on the capability of the device and the network connection to support IPv6 and is not a projection of active IPv6 connections. Mobile-device IPv6 capability is assessed based on OS support of IPv6 and estimations of the types of mobile network infrastructure to which the device can connect (3.5-generation [3.5G] or later). Fixed-device IPv6 capability is assessed based on device support of IPv6 and an estimation of the capability of the residential Customer Premises Equipment (CPE) or business routers to support IPv6, depending on the device end-user segment.
In November 1994, CDNow launched its BuyWeb program. CDNow had the idea that music-oriented websites could review or list albums on their pages that their visitors might be interested in purchasing. These websites could also offer a link that would take visitors directly to CDNow to purchase the albums. The idea for remote purchasing originally arose from conversations with music label Geffen Records in the fall of 1994. The management at Geffen wanted to sell its artists' CD's directly from its website but did not want to implement this capability itself. Geffen asked CDNow if it could design a program where CDNow would handle the order fulfillment. Geffen realized that CDNow could link directly from the artist on its website to Geffen's website, bypassing the CDNow home page and going directly to an artist's music page.[13]
Per capita IP and Internet traffic growth has followed a similarly steep growth curve over the past decade. Globally, monthly IP traffic will reach 50 GB per capita by 2022, up from 16 GB per capita in 2017, and Internet traffic will reach 44 GB per capita by 2022, up from 13 GB per capita in 2017. Ten years ago, in 2007, per capita Internet traffic was well under 1 GB per month. In 2000, per capita Internet traffic was 10 Megabytes (MB) per month.
Users expect their online experience to be always available and always secure—and their personal and business assets to be safe. The last several years have been easily the most eventful period from a security threat perspective, with many serious data breaches that have been discussed widely in the media. Given the scope of the monetary and brand damage associated with data breaches, cybersecurity is treated as a business risk rather than merely an IT issue. Advances in technology is the main driver for economic growth but has also led to a higher incidence of cyberattacks. The leading trends such as ecommerce, mobile payments, cloud computing, Big Data and analytics, IoT, AI, machine learning, and social media, all increase cyber risk for users and businesses. Compounding the problem, the nature of the threats is becoming more diverse. The list includes Distributed Denial-of-Service (DDoS), ransomware, Advanced Persistent Threats (APTs), viruses, worms, malware, spyware, botnets, spam, spoofing, phishing, hacktivism and potential state-sanctioned cyberwarfare.

Cisco’s approach to forecasting IP traffic has been characterized as conservative. Emerging trends and innovations in network architectures, device/connection deployments, and application adoption/usage have the potential to increase the outlook for traffic volumes, shapes and characteristics significantly. Based on our perspective and analysis, the following topics warrant consideration as future “wildcards” in the forecasting process.

In the case of cost per mille/click, the publisher is not concerned about whether a visitor is a member of the audience that the advertiser tries to attract and is able to convert, because at this point the publisher has already earned his commission. This leaves the greater, and, in case of cost per mille, the full risk and loss (if the visitor cannot be converted) to the advertiser.
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