The changing mix of devices and connections and growth in multidevice ownership affects traffic and can be seen in the changing device contribution to total IP traffic. At the end of 2017, 59 percent of IP traffic and 51 percent of Internet traffic originated from non-PC devices. By 2022, 81 percent of IP traffic and Internet traffic will originate from non-PC devices (Figure 4).
Mobile operators have increased the amount of data they offer consumers with plans in 2018. Some of these plans include data caps in excess of 25GB. Competition is fueling the increase, as operators like to keep up with their peers in offering "the most data" for marketing purposes. With mobile penetration reaching a saturation point in many countries across all regions, the strategy until 2017 was the implementation of tiered plans as a way to monetize data and effectively manage or throttle the top users of traffic. While the top 1 percent of the users continue to consume less data in comparison to five years ago, there has been a resurgence in unlimited plans. In general, data caps affect a larger percentage of mobile users than fixed users. On the fixed networks, data caps continue to increase to match subscribers’ growing appetite for video. In parallel, fixed broadband operators in most countries offered higher broadband speed tiers in 2018 compared with 2017. Chinese operators in particular have hiked fixed broadband speeds, offering in the hundreds of megabits; one even offers 1 Gbps. In the United States, most providers are offering 1 Gbps and one operator offers 2 Gbps. While 10 Gbps offers are elusive to most, fixed operators in Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, UAE and Qatar are offering these higher speed services.

The forecast for Internet video begins with estimations of the number of consumer fixed Internet users. Even such a basic measure as consumer fixed Internet users can be difficult to assess, because few analyst firms segment the number of users by both segment (consumer versus business) and network (mobile versus fixed). The number of consumer fixed Internet users was not taken directly from an analyst source but was estimated from analyst forecasts for consumer broadband connections, data on hotspot users from a variety of government sources, and population forecasts by age segment. The number of Internet video users was collected and estimated from a variety of sources, and the numbers were then reconciled with the estimate of overall Internet users.


Affiliate marketing is commonly confused with referral marketing, as both forms of marketing use third parties to drive sales to the retailer. The two forms of marketing are differentiated, however, in how they drive sales, where affiliate marketing relies purely on financial motivations, while referral marketing relies more on trust and personal relationships.[citation needed]
The Cisco data can be seven times higher than the Minnesota Internet Traffic Studies (MINTS) data not only because the Cisco figures are estimates for the global—not just the domestic US—Internet, but also because Cisco counts "general IP traffic (thus including closed networks that are not truly part of the Internet, but use IP, the Internet Protocol, such as the IPTV services of various telecom firms)".[29] The MINTS estimate of US national backbone traffic for 2004, which may be interpolated as 200 petabytes/month, is a plausible three-fold multiple of the traffic of the US's largest backbone carrier, Level(3) Inc., which claims an average traffic level of 60 petabytes/month.[30]
For each application subsegment, Minutes of Use (MOU) are estimated. Multiple sources are used to determine MOU. Special care is taken to help ensure that the total number of Internet video minutes is well within the total number of video minutes (including television broadcast) for each user. For example, if the average individual watches a total of 4 hours of video content per day, the sum of Internet, managed IP, and mobile video hours should be a relatively small portion of the total 4 hours.
Total Internet traffic has experienced dramatic growth in the past two decades. More than 20 years ago, in 1992, global Internet networks carried approximately 100 GB of traffic per day. Ten years later, in 2002, global Internet traffic amounted to 100 Gigabytes per second (GB/second). In 2017, global Internet traffic reached more than 45,000 GB/second. Table 1 provides a view of the historical benchmarks for total Internet traffic.
Globally, fixed and mobile network operators are broadly deploying the IPv6 protocol and supporting significant volumes of IPv6 traffic as a percentage of their overall IP traffic. The range of examples include France’s Free Telecom (40%), KDDI (46%), AT&T (63%), Comcast (64%), Verizon Wireless (86%), Reliance Jio (88%), and T-Mobile (94%) [Source: World IPv6 Launch Organization, September 2018]. Per Google, in Sept 2018, the percentage of users who access Google via IPv6 is nearly 25%; up from 11% in May 2017 [Source: Google Statistics September 2018].

Affiliates discussed the issues in Internet forums and began to organize their efforts. They believed that the best way to address the problem was to discourage merchants from advertising via adware. Merchants that were either indifferent to or supportive of adware were exposed by affiliates, thus damaging those merchants' reputations and tarnishing their affiliate marketing efforts. Many affiliates either terminated the use of such merchants or switched to a competitor's affiliate program. Eventually, affiliate networks were also forced by merchants and affiliates to take a stand and ban certain adware publishers from their network. The result was Code of Conduct by Commission Junction/beFree and Performics,[35] LinkShare's Anti-Predatory Advertising Addendum,[36] and ShareASale's complete ban of software applications as a medium for affiliates to promote advertiser offers.[37] Regardless of the progress made, adware continues to be an issue, as demonstrated by the class action lawsuit against ValueClick and its daughter company Commission Junction filed on April 20, 2007.[38]
After MOU have been estimated for each sub segment of video, the next step is to apply kilobytes (KB) per minute. To calculate KB per minute, first the regional and country average broadband speeds are estimated for the years 2017 through 2022. For each application category, a representative bit rate is established, and this representative bit rate grows at approximately the same pace as the broadband speed. For video categories, a 7 percent annual compression gain is applied to the bit rate. Local bit rates are then calculated based on how much the average broadband speed in the country differs from the global average, the digital screen size in the country, and the computing power of the average device in the country. Combining these factors yields bit rates that are then applied to the MOU.
Work[9] involving supervised machine learning to classify network traffic. Data are hand-classified (based upon flow content) to one of a number of categories. A combination of data set (hand-assigned) category and descriptions of the classified flows (such as flow length, port numbers, time between consecutive flows) are used to train the classifier. To give a better insight of the technique itself, initial assumptions are made as well as applying two other techniques in reality. One is to improve the quality and separation of the input of information leading to an increase in accuracy of the Naive Bayes classifier technique.

One of the main contributing factors to growing traffic is consumer video use. One of the main solutions to meet the demands of the increasing demand for bandwidth has long been leveraging Wi-Fi networks, which enables operators to scale capacity to meet their subscribers’ needs. Globally, there will be nearly 549 million public Wi-Fi hotspots by 2022, up from 124 million hotspots in 2017, a fourfold increase. Western Europe had the highest number of hotspots, with 48 percent of the world’s Wi-Fi hotspots in 2017. By 2022, Asia Pacific will have the highest percentage of 47 percent. Public Wi-Fi along with community hotspots are included in the forecast. Community hotspots or homespots have emerged as a potentially significant element of the public Wi-Fi landscape. In this model, subscribers allow part of the capacity of their residential gateway to be open to casual use. The homespots may be provided by a broadband or other provider directly or through a partner. Asia Pacific will lead in adoption of homespots. By 2022, China will lead in total number of homespots, followed by the United States and Japan.
Affiliate marketing is commonly confused with referral marketing, as both forms of marketing use third parties to drive sales to the retailer. The two forms of marketing are differentiated, however, in how they drive sales, where affiliate marketing relies purely on financial motivations, while referral marketing relies more on trust and personal relationships.[citation needed]
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